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therighteousmonster:

this is real Talk ! 

therighteousmonster:

this is real Talk ! 

(via untamedbabyhairs)

*48

Graphic Designer or labouring, van-based web designer?

In reply to application for a graphic design vacancy

Thanks for your reply and interest in the position of print designer with xxxx. If successful you will be expected to work a three-month, pro bono probationary period and will spend three days in the week labouring on site with our…

astreiana:

thranduils-queen:

tacobell-canon:

Ladypug.

what

holy smokes

astreiana:

thranduils-queen:

tacobell-canon:

Ladypug.

what

holy smokes

(via untamedbabyhairs)

sixpenceee:

Déjà Vu

Déjà vu is the experience of being certain that you have experienced or seen a new situation previously – you feel as though the event has already happened or is repeating itself.

The experience is usually accompanied by a strong sense of familiarity and a sense of eeriness, strangeness, or weirdness. The “previous” experience is usually attributed to a dream, but sometimes there is a firm sense that it has truly occurred in the past.

Déjà Vécu

Déjà vécu is what most people are experiencing when they think they are experiencing deja vu.

Déjà vu is the sense of having seen something before, whereas déjà vécu is the experience of having seen an event before, but in great detail – such as recognizing smells and sounds. 

Déjà Visité

Déjà visité is a less common experience and it involves an uncanny knowledge of a new place. For example, you may know your way around a a new town or a landscape despite having never been there, and knowing that it is impossible for you to have this knowledge. 

Déjà Senti

Déjà senti is the phenomenon of having “already felt” something. This is exclusively a mental phenomenon and seldom remains in your memory afterwards.

You could think of it as the feeling of having just spoken, but realizing that you, in fact, didn’t utter a word.

Jamais Vu

Jamais vu (never seen) describes a familiar situation which is not recognized. It is often considered to be the opposite of déjà vu and it involves a sense of eeriness. The observer does not recognize the situation despite knowing rationally that they have been there before.

Chris Moulin, of Leeds University, asked 92 volunteers to write out “door” 30 times in 60 seconds. He reported that 68% of the precipitants showed symptoms of jamais vu, such as beginning to doubt that “door” was a real word. This has lead him to believe that jamais vu may be a symptom of brain fatigue.

Presque Vu

Presque vu is very similar to the “tip of the tongue” sensation – it is the strong feeling that you are about to experience an epiphany – though the epiphany seldom comes. 

L’esprit de l’Escalier

L’esprit de l’escalier (stairway wit) is the sense of thinking of a clever comeback when it is too late. 

Capgras Delusion

Capgras delusion is the phenomenon in which a person believes that a close friend or family member has been replaced by an identical looking impostor. This could be tied in to the old belief that babies were stolen and replaced by changelings in medieval folklore, as well as the modern idea of aliens taking over the bodies of people on earth to live amongst us for reasons unknown. This delusion is most common in people with schizophrenia but it can occur in other disorders.

Fregoli Delusion

Fregoli delusion is a rare brain phenomenon in which a person holds the belief that different people are, in fact, the same person in a variety of disguises. It is often associated with paranoia and the belief that the person in disguise is trying to persecute them.

It was first reported in 1927 in the case study of a 27-year-old woman who believed she was being persecuted by two actors whom she often went to see at the theatre. She believed that these people “pursued her closely, taking the form of people she knows or meets”.

Prosopagnosia

Prosopagnosia is a phenomenon in which a person is unable to recognize faces of people or objects that they should know. People experiencing this disorder are usually able to use their other senses to recognize people – such as a person’s perfume, the shape or style of their hair, the sound of their voice, or even their gait. A classic case of this disorder was presented in the 1998 book (and later Opera by Michael Nyman) called “The man who mistook his wife for a hat”.

SOURCE

(via gallifreyglo)

wtf-fun-factss:

Who discovered America first - WTF fun facts

wtf-fun-factss:

Who discovered America first - WTF fun facts

so-treu:

crankyskirt:

The Life & Times of Doris Payne: A Tale of Carats, Cons, and Creating Your Own American Dream

Find out how a poor, single, African-American mother from segregated 1930s America winds up as one of the world’s most notorious and successful jewel thieves.
A glamorous 83-year-old, Doris Payne is as unapologetic today about the $2 million in jewels she’s stolen over a 60-year career as she was the day she stole her first carat. With Doris now on trial for the theft of a department store diamond ring, we probe beneath her consummate smile to uncover the secrets of her trade and what drove her to a life of crime. Stylized recreations, an extensive archive and candid interviews reveal how Payne managed to jet-set her way into any Cartier or Tiffany’s from Monte Carlo to Japan and walk out with small fortunes. This sensational portrait exposes a rebel who defies society’s prejudices and pinches her own version of the American Dream while she steals your heart.

You damn right, I’m watching this. Shit, I’m pissed that a crew of chicks hasn’t made a concept album in tribute to this woman. #femmeoutlaw
Especially since black criminals have so often been characterized as brutish and ignorant, while jewel theft is lionized as a crime for sophisticated masterminds who outsmart authorities (read: smartypants white dudes who do Mission Impossible type shit).

WHY DIDN’T I KNOW ABOUT HER

so-treu:

crankyskirt:

The Life & Times of Doris Payne: A Tale of Carats, Cons, and Creating Your Own American Dream

Find out how a poor, single, African-American mother from segregated 1930s America winds up as one of the world’s most notorious and successful jewel thieves.

A glamorous 83-year-old, Doris Payne is as unapologetic today about the $2 million in jewels she’s stolen over a 60-year career as she was the day she stole her first carat. With Doris now on trial for the theft of a department store diamond ring, we probe beneath her consummate smile to uncover the secrets of her trade and what drove her to a life of crime. Stylized recreations, an extensive archive and candid interviews reveal how Payne managed to jet-set her way into any Cartier or Tiffany’s from Monte Carlo to Japan and walk out with small fortunes. This sensational portrait exposes a rebel who defies society’s prejudices and pinches her own version of the American Dream while she steals your heart.

You damn right, I’m watching this. Shit, I’m pissed that a crew of chicks hasn’t made a concept album in tribute to this woman. #femmeoutlaw

Especially since black criminals have so often been characterized as brutish and ignorant, while jewel theft is lionized as a crime for sophisticated masterminds who outsmart authorities (read: smartypants white dudes who do Mission Impossible type shit).

WHY DIDN’T I KNOW ABOUT HER

(via gallifreyglo)

fatedxdestiny:

               #savebamon (x)

(via redfan4ever)

*76

With Chains That Bind

ravennnmarie said: Hey, I'm wanna watch Sleepy Hollow. Wanted to know if you had any opinions?

whothehellisbenedict:

DO I?!

Sleepy Hollow is pretty much, in my humblest of opinions, one of the best shows on recent television.

Why? Well…

PROS

  • If you’re tired of just seeing exclusively white characters in a show—well are you in luck! It’s probably a show that has one of the biggest POC casts, especially for being in the supernatural realm of TV—Abbie Mills, Jenny Mills, Capt. Irving and his family, Andy (played by John Cho), and more—all POC!
  • Relationships. Especially between Abbie and Ichabod. (Or, even Abbie and her sister Jenny). There’s just a really good dynamic between the two of them that I won’t tell you to interpret a certain way but tbh, you kinda have to try to not interpret it a “certain” way. But again, to each his own I suppose. Just know this, GREAT RELATIONSHIPS EXIST AND IT’S GREAT.
  • The actual plot is pretty good so far, I hope it doesn’t take a turn for some fuckery, but again it’s only been a season (SEASON 2 COMES OUT SEPT. 22!!!!). It’s 
  • If you’re into horror and historical references, you’ll love it. It’s not as sickening as Hannibal, but SH has it’s moments of being spooky let’s say. Also, zombie George Washington? Headless horsemen and witches? 
  • Ichabod getting used to the 21st century. He rants. He raves. Comic relief before the ensuing terror begins.
  • They sometimes call out the bullshit of the past in episodes. It’s satisfying to say the least.
  • A BLACK GIRL AS A LEAD IN A SUPERNATURAL CRIME SHOW? YOOOOOO

CONS

  • It’s only on once a week on Mondays. That said, it does make Mondays more bearable.
  • Some relationships…are…huh. You’ll understand once you watch.
  • The finale will make you mad because you have to wait like 2 more months to know what happens.
  • ???????
  • (There are like 2 more cons in my opinion but nothing that would stint your enjoyment of the show, and I don’t want to say them because they’re spoilery, so just trust me on this.)

HAPPY WATCHING!

Feel free to add anything guys!